SAS in the media

Google: the right to be forgotten

Tuesday 26 May 2015
Institute of Advanced Legal Studies
Dr Judith Townend , director of the Centre for Law and Information Policy ( CLIP ) at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies ( IALS ), was among the signatories of an open letter from 80 academics to Google , asking for more data and transparency on the ‘right to be forgotten’ or de-listing decisions and policy, following the European Court of Justice’s judgment in Google Spain v AEPD and Mario Costeja González in May last year. The letter was published in full on the Guardian  site and reported in the print edition with a response from G oogle .

Never too old to learn

Friday 15 May 2015
Institute of Historical Research
A former Institute of Historical Research ( IHR ) student, Elizabeth Adlington, has told Mature Times magazine that her master’s degree in historical research  transformed her view of her home city,  London. She is quoted as saying the course provided the 'rigorous, academically based intellectual challenge' she was looking for. 'The biggest challenge for me was learning how to integrate into a community of historians,’ says Elizabeth. ‘I had to adjust not only my writing, but also my thinking to a new milieu.

The Lancashire 'cotton famine'

Friday 15 May 2015
Institute of Historical Research
Professor Lawrence Goldman, director of the Institute of Historical Research ( IHR ), has featured on BBC Radio 4’s ‘In Our Time’ programme discussing the Lancashire Cotton Famine. During the 43-minute programme Professor Goldman explains that, during the mid-19th century upwards of a million people were one way or another involved in the cotton industry.

Monarchs have always meddled

Friday 15 May 2015
Institute of Historical Research
Dr Roland Quinault , Institute of Historical Research ( IHR ) fellow and expert in the history of British political leadership, has been quoted in a Guardian article about monarchs who meddle in politics. In ‘Queen's restraint is exception to rule of meddling monarchs’, Dr Quinault pointed out that, ‘All monarchs have had the right, and indeed the duty, to be consulted and to express their views confidentially to their ministers on all subjects.’ Read the article in The Guardian  

A major lesson from Ebola: pandemics are strongly driven by inequality

Friday 15 May 2015
School of Advanced Study
Professor Michael Baker ,  NZ-UK Link visiting professor, currently based at the School of Advanced Study ( SAS ), has published an article in The Conversation outlining one of the major lessons from the history of pandemics - that they are strongly influenced by health inequalities. Concluding the article, Professor Baker says, ‘Understanding the lessons from the history of pandemics – and applying these lessons – can support the global challenges of improving health equity and environmental sustainability. Achieving such development goals is challenging.

Professor Philip Murphy comments on Prince Charles’ ‘black spider’ memos

Friday 15 May 2015
Institute of Commonwealth Studies
In ‘Sorry Prince Charles, the British government isn’t a soft play area’ for The Conversation , Professor Philip Murphy , director of the Institute of Commonwealth Studies ( ICWS ), challenges the defenders of Prince Charles who have suggested his letters represent part of a legitimate process of educating himself in the business of government. ‘The notion that writing hectoring notes to ministers counts as preparation for the role of constitutional monarch in the 21st century seems questionable in the extreme,’ says Professor Murphy.

Five lessons we should have learned from pandemics

Tuesday 12 May 2015
School of Advanced Study
Professor Michael Baker , NZ-UK Link visiting professor, currently based at the School of Advanced Study, wonders why we are still surprised pandemics happen. In an article for The Guardian Healthcare Network , he says there are more than 1,400 known human pathogens and almost all of them are capable of causing epidemic increases.

The science of what makes great wines tick

Tuesday 12 May 2015
Institute of Philosophy
Professor Barry C Smith , director of the Institute of Philosophy ( IP ), has been quoted in a New Scientist article (behind a paywall). Discussing the sensory impact of the presence of minerals in soil used to grow wine grapes Professor Smith says, ‘The idea you can taste minerals from the soil is absolute rubbish.’ The article was also picked up and analysed on The Drinks Business website. Read the article in the New Scientist (behind a paywall) Read the article on The Drinks Business website

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