SAS in the media

Ma Vie en Francais

Wednesday 4 March 2015
School of Advanced Study
Professor Andrew Hussey , director of the Centre for Post-Colonial Studies ( CPCS ), has been telling listeners of BBC Radio 4 Sunday morning magazine programme, Broadcasting House, how learning to speak French changed his life. Running for just over 4 minutes, 'Ma Vie en Francais' provides a snapshot of Professor Hussey’s first visit to Paris as a teenage punk rock musician. A reluctant learner, he came back from that trip fired up by French punk rock and ‘getting into French’, to his teachers astonishment.

Only one in 65 new students chooses a modern language degree – we need a rethink

Thursday 19 February 2015
Institute of Modern Languages Research
Professor Catherine Davies , director of the Institute of Modern Languages Research ( IMLR ), has responded to a recent Higher Education Statistics Agency report that only one in 65 students choose to study a modern language degree. Writing for The Conversation, Professor Davies said ‘intervention is needed to boost numbers and address the mismatch between supply and demand’. Read the article in The Conversation

As light as your footsteps

Wednesday 18 February 2015
Institute of Philosophy
Dr Ophelia Deroy’s  experiments revealing the effects of walking sounds on body representation have been reported in the New Scientist. The associate director of IP , and member of the AHRC 'Rethinking the Senses' project, collaborated with a University College London team in the new CenSes  laboratory to test the multisensory character of body representation. Changing volunteers’ walking sounds through technology, induced a change in perception of body shapes and physical capabilities, and enhanced motivation for exercise.

What's happening in Black British history?

Tuesday 17 February 2015
Institute of Commonwealth Studies
A Black British history initiative supported by the Institute of Commonwealth Studies ( ICWS ) and taking place at Liverpool University on 19 February, has featured on BBC Radio Merseyside. The preview of the second workshop in the ‘ What’s happening in Black British history ’ series included an interview with one of the organisers who says the event has ‘academic rigor without elitism’.   Listen to the podcast (at 17.30)  

The French Intifada

Tuesday 17 February 2015
School of Advanced Study
Professor Andrew Hussey , director of the Centre for Post-Colonial Studies       ( CPCS ), has been described in a review of his acclaimed book, The French Intifada , as a British Academic that knows France and its colonial history better than most French People. The review, which appears in the Irish Times, also says The French Intifada ‘is the sort of book that enrages the substantial number of French people who live in a state of denial.’ Read the review in the Irish Times

Why do my eyes water when I chop onions?

Tuesday 17 February 2015
Institute of Philosophy
Professor Barry C. Smith , director of the Centre for the Study of the Senses ( CenSes ) at the Institute of Philosophy ( IP ) has been explaining to the Mail on Sunday why our eyes water when we chop onions. It’s all to do with the trigeminal nerve in the brain says Professor Smith. The molecules that the chopped onions release into the air get into the nose and cause a sting that irritates the trigeminal nerve, which thinks the ‘eyes are being attacked, so it sends a signal that makes them water to flush away the irritant.’ Read the article in the Mail on Sunday

Choosing a new Commonwealth Secretary General: more politicking?

Tuesday 17 February 2015
Institute of Commonwealth Studies
Dr Sue Onslow , senior research fellow at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies ( ICWS ) has had an opinion piece published in The Round Table: The Commonwealth Journal of International Affairs . It appears in Volume 104, Issue 1 and discusses the politics involved in choosing a Secretary General for the Commonwealth. Dr Onslow says the process is ‘a political minefield especially as the size of the association expanded and its international relations lurched from one crisis to another. Do Commonwealth heads want a quiet life?

When cotton was king

Tuesday 10 February 2015
Institute of English Studies
Dr Cynthia Johnston, course tutor at the Institute of English Studies ( IES ) and lead curator of a new exhibition that showcases the treasures of several 19th-century Lancashire mill magnates, has featured in several media outlets. These include Dr Johnston discussing the ‘Cotton to Gold’ event on BBC Radio 4’s Frontrow and BBC London’s Robert Elms show.

France’s ideals, forged in revolution, face a modern test

Thursday 5 February 2015
School of Advanced Study
Professor Andrew Hussey , director of the Centre for Post-Colonial Studies       ( CPCS ), has been quoted extensively in a New York Times (NYT)  analysis of the French debates following the Charlie Hebdo attacks in Paris and in a TLS ( Times Literary Supplement ) blog post.

Legacy of a 'flawed hero'

Monday 2 February 2015
Institute of Commonwealth Studies
Professor Philip Murphy , director of the Institute of Commonwealth Studies       ( ICWS ) and Professor of British and Commonwealth History, has written an article for The Conversation exploring the legacy of Winston Churchill. The article, 'Churchill and India: imperial chauvinism left a bitter legacy', refers to the former prime minister as a soft target for those who enjoy debunking the reputation of national heroes.

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