SAS in the media

Professor Henning Melber on Dag Hammarskjöld: why he died and why it matters

Saturday 2 April 2016
Institute of Commonwealth Studies
Dr Susan Williams and Professor Henning Melber , both senior research fellows at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies ( ICWS ), are quoted in a Sign of the Times blog article on Dag Hammarskjöld, the late UN secretary-general. The article on the Scott.net news site includes a podcast interview with Professor Melber in which he discusses Dr Williams’s book, Who Killed Hammarskjold? , the suspicious circumstances of the secretary-general’s death and why it matters today.

The Sea, the sea – Professor Sarah Churchwell on the making of a monster

Saturday 2 April 2016
School of Advanced Study
Iris Murdoch and her ‘flawed protagonists’ were the subject of a Guardian article by Professor Sarah Churchwell, SAS chair of the public understanding of the humanities and professorial fellow in American literature at the Institute of English Studies ( IES ). They are often blinkered by their own egotism, she writes, but ‘The Sea’s Charles Arrowby is a bully to beat all others.’  

ICWS course provides ‘invaluable experiences’

Wednesday 30 March 2016
Institute of Commonwealth Studies
Minah Ahn, a Routledge/Round Table scholarship student at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies ( ICWS ), tells The Commonwealth Journal of International Affairs that the MA in Understanding and Securing Human Rights provides her with many ‘invaluable experiences’ and is a ‘unique chance to partake in high-quality Commonwealth events’. The Routledge/Round Table scholarship is open to students from Commonwealth countries outside the UK who have been accepted on the MA course , and it is topped up by ICWS through a fee waiver.

Living Gatsby

Tuesday 29 March 2016
Institute of English Studies
The Great Gatsby event, which will bring the jazz-age world of F Scott Fitzgerald’s masterpiece to life in Senate House this May, features in the Evening Standard’s Londoner’s Diary . Led by Professor Sarah Churchwell , professorial fellow in American literature at the Institute of English Studies ( IES ), School of Advanced Study, it is the first in a series of ‘ Living Literature ’ immersive theatre events, and will include talks and presentations from experts in the history of F Scott Fitzgerald and Prohibition-era New York.

The Rif connection: Morocco’s crucible of terrorism

Sunday 27 March 2016
School of Advanced Study
Professor Andrew Hussey , OBE, director of the Centre for Postcolonial Studies ( CPS ), School of Advanced Study, explains in The Sunday Times [behind a paywall] why Morocco’s Rif Mountains have proved fertile ground for Islamist radicals.  

Immigration and trade in politics

Tuesday 22 March 2016
Institute of Commonwealth Studies
Sir Ronald Sanders , senior research fellow at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies ( ICWS ), writes in the Jamaica Observer and Caribbean News Now! that a sensible discourse on trade and immigration would be useful in the Caribbean as much as in the US. He says they are issues that are worthy of inquiry and research at all levels, particularly by academics and journalists. ‘The fact that, apart from opportunistic braying on immigration, the two issues have been avoided by politicians is all the more reason why they should be considered dispassionately and publicly.’

Professor Sarah Churchwell on Philip Roth

Saturday 19 March 2016
School of Advanced Study
Professor Sarah Churchwell, the School of Advanced Study’s chair of public understanding of the humanities and professorial fellow in American literature at the Institute of English Studies ( IES ), commemorates Philip Roth’s 83rd birthday in an Independent   article. She says ‘Over nearly 50 years as a novelist Roth has earned a deserved reputation as a writer who speaks his mind – a mind that rarely runs out of things worth saying.’

Don’t believe everything you see

Wednesday 16 March 2016
Institute of Philosophy
 A keynote speech given by Professor Sir Colin Blakemore (director of the Centre for the Study of the Senses - CenSes ) at the College of Optometrists’ annual conference features in Optometry Today . The article focuses on the neuroscientist’s account of how visual information is processed by the brain which, he explains, has very limited resources and ‘is always making judgements about what is the most salient part of the image. Anyone who goes to a magic show knows they can’t trust their vision.

Professor Mads Andenæs discusses the Julian Assange case

Tuesday 15 March 2016
Professor Mads Andenæs , senior research fellow at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies ( IALS ) and chair of the UN Working Group on Arbitrary Detention, explains in a Pravada.ru interview why the expert panel defends freedom for WikiLeaks founder, Julian Assange and the legal implications of a case in which he says ‘several procedural mistakes’ were ‘committed by the authorities.’ He also comments on the media coverage and other WikiLeaks revelations such as the US surveillance of German chancellor, Angela Merkel and UN secretary General, Ban Ki-moon.

A double celebration on Commonwealth Day

Monday 14 March 2016
Institute of Commonwealth Studies
Professor Philip Murphy , director of the Institute of Commonwealth Studies ( ICWS ) tells CBC News that the Commonwealth is a completely different organisation from the EU. Speaking during the Commonwealth Day celebrations, he says ‘The problem with the Commonwealth is that no one has been prepared to pool sovereignty or to make treaties, or to make real sacrifices, so it’s a bit of an empty vessel compared with the EU.’  

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