SAS in the media

IHR fellow reviews 'The Fatherland and the Jews"

Friday 19 March 2021
Institute of Historical Research
Daniel Snowman , senior research fellow at the Institute of Historical Research ( IHR ), reviewed The Fatherland and the Jews: Two Pamphlets by Alfred Wiener, 1919 and 1924 for The Jewish Chronicle . The pamphlets under discussion, 'Prelude to pogroms? Facts for the Thoughtful' and 'German Judaism in political, economic and cultural terms', tackle issues such as the planned rise of antisemitism and the scapegoating of minorities and mark the first time that Alfred Wiener, Wiener Holocaust Library founder, has been published in English.

Professor Churchwell on the language of 'The Great Gatsby'

Friday 12 March 2021
School of Advanced Study
Professor Sarah Churchwell , public engagement chair at the School of Advanced Study and American literature professorial fellow at the Institute of English Studies ( IES ), discusses, on BBC Radio 3’s The Verb programme, the language of F Scott Fitzgerald's classic, The Great Gatsby , and why it still resonates today.

Professor Murphy comments on reactions to Meghan and Harry interview

Wednesday 10 March 2021
Institute of Commonwealth Studies
Professor Philip Murphy , director of the Institute of Commonwealth Studies (ICWS), comments on Britain’s reactions to the Oprah interview with the Duke and Duchess of Sussex on California’s KCBS radio station. Meanwhile, in the Guardian , ‘Meghan and Harry racism row ‘may deepen schisms in Commonwealth’, and the Times , ‘ Calls in former colonies to drop Queen as head of state after Harry and Meghan interview ’, he considers the impact the interview will have in the Caribbean and whether it could be ‘weaponised in support of a republic’.

Thrills and gut-spills: why have Vikings taken over pop culture?

Saturday 20 February 2021
Institute of Historical Research
Dr Simon Trafford , lecturer in medieval history and director of studies at the Institute of Historical Research ( IHR) , is quoted in a Guardian article on the ubiquity of the Vikings in popular culture.

A marketplace and a temple

Thursday 18 February 2021
Institute of Classical Studies
The Life and Death of Ancient Cities. A Natural History , the latest book by Professor Greg Woolf , director of the Institute of Classical Studies ( ICS ), has been well-received by the London Review of Books . Drawing on the written record, archaeology, demographics, human geography and environmental science, it tells the story of our species’ early brushes with urbanism that started in the fertile crescent of the Middle East in the fourth millennium BC.

The rise of the Tudors

Thursday 18 February 2021
Institute of Historical Research
Dr Adam Chapman , lecturer in medieval history at the Institute of Historical Research ( IHR) and Victoria County History ( VCH ) editor, has written ‘The rise of the Tudors’ for the February issue of BBC History Magazine (available on subscription). The article explores the history of the Tudors before they were a royal dynasty, taking readers on a colourful journey into medieval Welsh history.

Life without liberty: how Covid turned Paris into a city of fear

Wednesday 17 February 2021
School of Advanced Study
School of Advanced Study cultural historian Professor Andrew Hussey , has published an article in the New Statesman which looks at how Covid-19 turned Paris into a city of fear with strict curfew, tough police measures and rising crime.

A history of the tongue

Sunday 14 February 2021
Institute of Philosophy
Professor Barry Smith , director of the Institute of Philosophy ( IP )and Centre for the Study of the Senses ( CenSes ), contributed to BBC Radio 3’s, ‘ A history of the tongue ’ programme, a scholarly exploration of the tongue’s role in talk, tasting and love in early modern history. The programme was written and presented by Professor John Gallagher, historian and Arts and Humanities Research Council and Radio 3 New Generation Thinker.

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