SAS in the media

Warburg professor discusses folk practice, emptying Milwaukee’s bins, and bargain cinema tickets

Thursday 14 September 2017
Senate House Library
Professor John Tresch, who joins the Warburg Institute this month as its Mellon Foundation-funded chair in history of art, science and folk practice, features in the Times Higher Education’s HE & Me column. In the wide-ranging discussion Professor Tresch says he would immediately ‘end fees’ if he were universities minister for a day and would like to be remembered for ‘inhabiting contradictions with a little grace.’

Professor Smith explores taste, subjective pleasure and expertise

Tuesday 12 September 2017
Institute of Philosophy
Professor Barry C Smith , director of the Institute of Philosophy ( IP ), discusses questions of artistic taste and judgement and explores the idea of taste, subjective pleasure and expertise on BBC Radio 4’s Tick Box Art programme (at 8:30).

Professor Geoffrey Alderman reviews ‘Jabotinsky's Children’

Thursday 7 September 2017
Institute of Historical Research
Professor Geoffrey Alderman, senior research fellow at the Institute of Historical Research ( IHR ), reviews Daniel Kupfert Heller’s book Jabotinsky's Children: Polish Jews and the Rise of Right-Wing Zionism , for the Times Higher Education ( THE ) magazine.

Professor Sherman’s appointment in Connaissance des Arts

Wednesday 6 September 2017
Warburg Institute
The appointment of Professor Bill Sherman as The Warburg Institute’s new director is highlighted in a Connaissance des Arts article (in French). Professor Sherman joins the institute on 1 October.

Remembering the Civil War

Friday 1 September 2017
Institute of Historical Research
The Institute of Historical Research’s (IHR) Cromwell Association Directory of Parliamentarian Army Officers , which was launched in May, features in the BBC’s Who Do You Think You Are magazine. The magazine also highlights the institute’s Victoria County History publications as one of the three digital resources that has ‘caught its attention’.

This is how blind people are able to echolocate like bats

Thursday 31 August 2017
Institute of Philosophy
Dr Andrew Kolarik , postdoctoral research fellow at the Institute of Philosophy ( IP ), explains in the New Scientist how and why some blind people can echolocate like bats, making clicks with their mouths that help them understand the environment around them.

South Africa’s first online rhino horn auction ends in risky impasse

Tuesday 29 August 2017
Institute of Commonwealth Studies
Professor Keith Somerville , senior research fellow at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies ( ICWS ), analyses South Africa's first legal rhino horn auction. Writing in The Conversation , he says the inconclusive result of the online auction is a setback to achieving a legal, commercial trade in horn, and that while ‘there is no single solution or silver bullet to put an end to poaching, the present impasse will only make things worse.’ 

A brief history of the British Royals and their alleged Nazi connections

Monday 28 August 2017
Institute of Historical Research
Dr Karina Urbach , senior research fellow at the Institute of Historical Research ( IHR ), is mentioned in a World News Australia article. Entitled 'A brief history of the British Royals and their alleged Nazi connections', it highlights material from Dr Urbach’s book, Go-Betweens for Hitler .

SAS 2017 honorary graduate in THE

Thursday 24 August 2017
School of Advanced Study
Professor Sir Alan Wilson , who will be awarded an honorary degree at the School of Advanced Study’s graduation ceremony in December, is interviewed by the Times Higher Education magazine ( THE ) for its ‘HR & Me’ column. Responding to the question ‘What does the honorary degree from the School of Advanced Study mean to you?’ Sir Alan said, ‘It is an honour and a privilege. I was particularly touched that my contribution to the arts and humanities was recognised.’

 Academics push South Africa to open apartheid-era archives

Thursday 24 August 2017
Institute of Commonwealth Studies
Professor Philip Murphy , director of the Institute of Commonwealth Studies ( ICWS ), is quoted in a Times Higher Education ( THE ) article about an academic campaign to force South Africa to open its apartheid-era archives to researchers. Having access to these documents, said Professor Murphy, could allow scholars to ‘see how far the historical record bears out’ the public statements of politicians and throw light on the biggest question of all: ‘What brought the regime to its knees?’

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