SAS in the media

Professor Hussey on Emmanuel Macron’s African artefacts pledge and the enduring power of Albert Camus’ L'Étranger

Friday 8 December 2017
School of Advanced Study
Andrew Hussey , professor of cultural history, features on BBC Radio 4’s Front Row (at 13:20) show in a discussion on the reaction in France to Emmanuel Macron’s call for African artefacts held in French museums to be returned to their countries of origin. He examines the practicalities of such a pledge, and what pressure it might put on Britain’s museums. Meanwhile, on CBC Radio , he delves into the enduring power of Albert Camus' L'Étranger , and profiles Emmanuel Macron for the Spanish language journal, Sin Permiso .

Dr Castrillo on the Reformation and today’s superfast politics

Friday 8 December 2017
School of Advanced Study
Dr Maria Castrillo, Senate House Library’s ( SHL ) head of special collections and engagement, draws historic parallels with the Reformation and today’s ‘superfast politics’ on BBC Radio 4 (at 09.37; 12.05).

Long road for Zim-UK rapprochement

Thursday 7 December 2017
Institute of Commonwealth Studies
Professor Philip Murphy , director of the Institute of Commonwealth Studies ( ICWS ), was quoted in a  Financial Gazette   (South Africa) article entitled 'Long road for Zim-UK rapprochement'. The article was picked up by the  African Seer .   

Ireland’s Edge 2017 – what it means to be Irish abroad

Saturday 2 December 2017
Institute of Advanced Legal Studies
Dr Nóra Ni Loideain , director of the Information Law and Policy Centre ( ILPC ) at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies ( IALS ), features on Ireland’s national public-service media organisation RTÉ (at 59:55). The show was recorded at Ireland’s Edge 2017 – Migration Nation event where Dr Loideian interviewed the keynote speaker and joined the conference’s reflections panel.  

Martin Plaut on Eritrea’s ‘mass exodus’ and Pottinger Bell’s collapse

Thursday 30 November 2017
Institute of Commonwealth Studies
Martin Plaut , senior research fellow at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies ( ICWS ), is quoted in a Telegraph article entitled ‘Eritrea, where the EU is hoodwinked into paying millions to a regime encouraging a mass exodus’. Registration is needed to read the full story. Meanwhile, in the British Journalism Review , he analyses the collapse of Bell Pottinger, one of Britain’s most prestigious and powerful public relations agencies, which he says would not have ‘happened without the investigative zeal of a group of dedicated journalists in South Africa.’

Professor Fox on the Nazis’ attempts to appeal to Scottish nationalists during WW2

Tuesday 28 November 2017
Institute of Historical Research
Professor Jo Fox, the Institute of Historical Research’s ( IHR ) incoming director, examines the Nazis’ attempts to appeal to Scottish nationalists through radio broadcasts from ‘secret stations’ such as Radio Caledonia. In the 28-minute BBC Radio 4 programme she draws attention to the ‘lost’ transcripts of Radio Caledonia and reveals that its presenter Donald Grant was not executed for treason, escaping the fate of William Joyce (‘Lord Haw-Haw’), broadcaster of Nazi propaganda to Britain from Germany during World War Two.

Professor Murphy on what it would mean if Zimbabwe were to be readmitted to the Commonwealth

Monday 27 November 2017
Professor Philip Murphy , director of the Institute of Commonwealth Studies ( ICWS ), explains in The Times (behind a paywall) what it would mean if Zimbabwe were to be readmitted to the Commonwealth having been suspended from it in 2002 over political violence against opponents of the Mugabe regime. The story has been picked up by The Australian (print).

London’s forgotten black Tudors

Thursday 23 November 2017
Institute of Commonwealth Studies
Dr Miranda Kaufmann , senior research fellow at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies ( ICWS ), features in a Southwark News review of her book, Black Tudors : the untold story , which paints a vivid picture of what life was like for the migrants who lived as free men and women before Britain became involved in the slave trade.

Being Human 2017 in the media

Thursday 23 November 2017
School of Advanced Study
The nine-day Being Human festival , which concluded on 25 November, features in the Times Higher Education ( THE ) magazine; the Chester Standard (print); Sunderland Vibe ; Northampton Chronicle ; Daventry Today (print); Norwich’s Evening News 24 ; Quartz ; Eastern Daily Press ; Great Yarmouth Mercury ; the Watton & Swaffham Times ;  London 24 ; Spitalfields Life ; Leicester Mercury (print); University of Toronto’s Records of Early English Drama ; Care Appointments ; the British Theatre Guide ; and London Live .

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