SAS in the media

Review of Professor Tresch's 'The Reason for the Darkness of the Night'

Monday 14 June 2021
Warburg Institute
The Reason for the Darkness of the Night: Edgar Allan Poe and the Forging of American Science by John Tresch, Warburg Institute professor of history of art, science, and folk practice, has been reviewed by The Wall Street Journal , Shelf Awareness , Kirkus Reviews on WYPR-FM , and in The New Yorker’s ‘Briefly Noted’ section. Described as a ‘bold new biography of a writer whose short, tortured life continues to fascinate’, it reveals Poe's obsession with science and lifelong ambition to advance and question human knowledge.

PM praises recipe book for people with Long Covid

Tuesday 8 June 2021
Institute of Philosophy
Professor Barry Smith , director of the Institute of Philosophy ( IP ) and its Centre for the Study of the Senses ( CenSes ), is name-checked in the Daily Mail article, Did Boris Johnson lose his sense of taste after Covid battle? PM praises recipe book for people with Long Covid who found coffee tasted like 'fruity sewage' - saying he has 'a renewed interest in diet and cookery' . It highlights his work with the Life Kitchen team where he used his scientific expertise to help create a cookbook with menus suitable for patients who suffer a dramatic change in their sense of taste.

Why AI should be afraid of us

Saturday 5 June 2021
Institute of Philosophy
Professor Ophelia Deroy , director of the Institute of Philosophy’s interdisciplinary Centre for Research in Experimental Aesthetics, Technology and Engineering, is interviewed by the New York Times about her work showing that rather than distrusting AI, when people become aware they are dealing with an altruistic algorithm, they take advantage of it and feel no remorse or empathy. Could such behaviour lead to us treating people less empathetically, or could the AI learn to be more ruthless when dealing with us? See also ‘ Humans are ready to take advantage of benevolent AI ’.

Germany offers €1.1 billion to atone for genocide in colonial Namibia

Friday 28 May 2021
Institute of Commonwealth Studies
Professor Henning Melber , senior research fellow at the School of Advanced Study's Institute of Commonwealth Studies ( ICWS ), discusses Germany’s agreement to pay Namibia €1.1bn (£940m) in official recognition of the consequences brought by the early 20th-century’s state-sponsored Herero-Nama genocide.

Prof Churchwell on BBC's Politics Live programme

Thursday 20 May 2021
School of Advanced Study
Professor Sarah Churchwell , public engagement chair at the School of Advanced Study, University of London, and professorial fellow in American literature at the Institute of English Studies, joined a panel of experts on BBC 2’s Politics Live programme to discuss plans to overhaul British rail, a possible trade deal between the UK and Australia, and what lessons – if any – the Labour party can learn from Joe Biden's Democrats.

Professor Clarke on the Cerne Abbas giant

Sunday 16 May 2021
Institute of Historical Research
Professor Catherine Clarke , director of the Institute of Historical Research’s Centre for the History of People, Place and Community, discusses the Saxons and the Cerne Abbas giant on BBC Radio 4’s Broadcasting House show (from 53:34–57:40).

IMLR conference features in German media

Saturday 15 May 2021
Institute of Modern Languages Research
A report on ‘ Covid and the woman writer ’, an Institute of Modern Languages Research ( IMLR ) conference, features in the Berlin newspaper Berliner Zeitung . The article written (in German) by a participant, underlines its international reach and relevance. The conference was organised under the auspices of   Centre for the Study of Contemporary Women’s Writing at the IMLR ,

Hope without belief: how the Frankfurt School took on the anxieties of modernity

Friday 14 May 2021
Institute of Philosophy
Professor Mark Hannam, associate research fellow at the Institute of Philosophy ( IP ) at the School of Advanced Study, University of London, reviews Migrants in the Profane for the Times Literary Supplement . Written by American historian, Peter E Gordon, the book explores the work of three of the Frankfurt School’s most esteemed thinkers, Walter Benjamin, Max Horkheimer and Theodor W Adorno.

Study to probe how Windrush scandal unfolded more than 70 years on

Thursday 13 May 2021
School of Advanced Study
The School of Advanced Study’s Windrush project which has recently secured a £600,000 grant from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), features in the Voice story ‘ Research study to probe how the Windrush Scandal unfolded more than 70 years on ’. The three-year project will focus on the history of changes to immigration policy which led to the scandal and resulted in British citizens being unjustly deported, dismissed from their jobs and deprived of essential services such as NHS care.

Global Britain and the question of communication

Tuesday 11 May 2021
Institute of Modern Languages Research
Professor Charles Burdett , director of the Institute of Modern Languages Research at the School of Advanced Study, University of London, has published an opinion piece in the Languages, Society & Policy journal. Entitled ‘ Global Britain and the question of communication ’, it looks at the teaching of modern foreign languages, the implications of the proposed GCSE reforms, and argues that the formal consideration of culture needs to contribute towards how the qualification is taught and assessed.

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