SAS in the media

Second inscribed stone found at Tintagel

Friday 27 July 2018
Institute of English Studies
Michelle Brown , professor emerita of medieval manuscript studies at the Institute of English Studies ( IES ), will feature in an article in the September issue of Current Archaeology (print). Entitled ‘ Second inscribed stone found at Tintage l’ it highlights the task Professor Brown undertook of deciphering the inscription on the seventh-century window ledge found at Tintagel Castle.

Warburg in the Guardian and Artlyst

Friday 27 July 2018
Warburg Institute
The Warburg Institute is name-checked in a Guardian article (picked up by Artlyst ) about Charles Saumarez Smith, the outgoing Royal Academy’s chief executive who studied for his doctorate at the institute in the 1980s.

Chief charlatan: the greatest imposter of the jazz age

Wednesday 25 July 2018
School of Advanced Study
Sarah Churchwell, public engagement chair and professorial fellow in American literature at the Institute of English Studies ( IES ), reviews Paul Willetts’ King Con: the Bizarre Adventures of the Jazz Age’s Greatest Impostor for the New Statesman . 

Does music make a difference to the taste of the food you eat?

Tuesday 24 July 2018
Institute of Philosophy
Professor Barry Smith , director of the Institute of Philosophy ( IP ) and founder of the Centre for the Study of the Senses ( CenSes ), explores what impact the music in restaurants has on the taste of the food on BBC Radio 4’s The World Tonight (at 29.40) and repeated on the station's  Pick of the Week programme. 

When Margaret Thatcher rode to Robert Mugabe’s rescue

Monday 23 July 2018
Institute of Commonwealth Studies
Dr Sue Onslow , deputy director of the Institute of Commonwealth Studies ( ICWS ), and senior research fellow Martin Plaut , highlights, in the New Statesman and Daily Maverick , newly released cables that reveal a surprisingly close relationship between Margaret Thatcher and Robert Mugabe.

What peace will mean for Eritrea – Africa’s ‘North Korea’

Thursday 19 July 2018
Institute of Commonwealth Studies
Martin Plaut , senior research fellow the Institute of Commonwealth Studies ( ICWS ), explains in The Conversation and the New European , what peace will mean for Eritrea, which he dubs Africa’s ‘North Korea’.

Professor Smith on how we perceive flavour and evaluate taste

Tuesday 17 July 2018
Institute of Philosophy
Professor Barry Smith , director of the Institute of Philosophy ( IP ) and founder of the Centre for the Study of the Senses ( CenSes ), discusses whisky and food, herring, meringues, aphrodisiacs and roasted peaches on BBC Radio 4’s Kitchen Cabinet . And in a talk forming part of the J. Paul Getty Museum’s exhibition,  Plato in LA: Contemporary Artists' Vision , he brought together ancient philosophy and modern neuroscience for a multisensory exploration of wine and a discussion about how we perceive flavour and evaluate taste.

Butterflies, busy weekend and chicken salad

Monday 16 July 2018
Institute of English Studies
Leah Henrickson, MA in History of the Book alumna, has published an article in Authorship entitled Butterflies, busy weekends, and chicken salad: genetic criticism and the output of @Pentametron . It is based on work she did during the course.

Martin Plaut on the historic meeting between Ethiopia and Eritrea’s prime ministers

Sunday 15 July 2018
Institute of Commonwealth Studies
Martin Plaut , senior research fellow at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies ( ICWS ), features in the Guardian article ‘ Ethiopia hails its charismatic young leader as a peacemaker ’. On the historic meeting between Abiy Ahmed, Ethiopia’s prime minister, and the Eritrean president Isaias Afwerki, he says ‘The entire history of [Isaias] is as a ruthless Marxist-Leninist … Enemies were shot and killed. Economically, his position has always been: we are completely self-reliant. Is this guy going to become a happy-clappy liberal?

How World Cup glory speak to a new generation of French fans

Sunday 15 July 2018
School of Advanced Study
Andrew Hussey , professor of cultural history at the School of Advanced Study, analyses what World Cup glory means for young, multiracial France in the Guardian article, ‘ How would World Cup glory speak to a new generation of French fans? ’

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