SAS in the media

Swedish academia is no meritocracy

Thursday 1 June 2017
Institute of English Studies
Dr Johan A Warodell, postdoctoral visiting research fellow at the Institute of English Studies ( IES ), has co-written an opinion piece in the Times Higher Education ( THE ) magazine, calling for a change to the way academics are hired in Swedish universities.

Professor Davies hazards a guess at the meaning of Trump’s ‘covfefe’ tweet

Wednesday 31 May 2017
Institute of Modern Languages Research
Professor Catherine Davies , director of the Institute of Modern Languages Research ( IMLR ), gives her thoughts on Donald Trump’s bewildering 'Despite negative press covfefe' midnight tweet. She hazarded a guess on CBS Radio San Francisco , that ‘covfefe’ was an acronym meaning, 'Carry on victorious for ever and ever'.   Interview (MP3)

The Handmaid’s Tale reassessed

Wednesday 31 May 2017
School of Advanced Study
Professor Sarah Churchwell reassesses The Handmaid’s Tale , Margaret Atwood’s dystopian novel currently being serialised on Channel 4 . Speaking on BBC Radio 4’s Front Row programme (from 10:01), the public engagement chair and professorial fellow in American literature at the Institute of English Studies ( IES ), debates its significance, and considers to what extent the television adaption lives up to the book.

It’s 30 years since Cuito Cuanavale. How the battle redefined southern Africa

Monday 29 May 2017
Institute of Commonwealth Studies
Professor Keith Somerville , senior research fellow at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies ( ICWS ), remembers the battle at Cuito Cuanavale in Southern Angola. Writing in The Conversation , he explains how the conflict, which took place 30 years ago, redefined South Africa.

IHR’s 'Layers of London' project on BBC Radio London

Saturday 27 May 2017
Institute of Historical Research
Seif El Rashidi, project development officer for the Institute of Historical Research’s ( IHR ) ‘ Layers of London ’ project, was a guest on BBC Radio London’s Robert Elms programme (starts at 1:12:20). He described the project and its new website which allows people to create and interact with many different ‘layers’ of London’s history from the Romans to the present day.

Model wine-tasting

Saturday 27 May 2017
Institute of Philosophy
The Warburg Institute and the Institute of Philosophy’s ( IP ) two-day interactive ‘TA(s)TE at Tate’ event, at London’s Tate Exchange on 27–28 April, is highlighted in The Telegraph (register to read in full). The article, ‘Knock your taste buds into shape’, focuses on Professor Barry Smith’s (IP director) exploration of the idea that we taste in shapes.

Populism on the rise as South Africa and Namibia gear up to elect new presidents

Thursday 25 May 2017
Institute of Commonwealth Studies
Professor Henning Melber , senior research fellow at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies ( ICWS ), discusses South Africa and Namibia’s slide into populism in The Conversation . Meanwhile, in a post on the Dag Hammarskjöld Foundation’s blog , he highlights the little-known connection between the former UN Secretary-General and trailblazing journalist, Pauline Frederick.

Senate House Library praised in the media

Tuesday 23 May 2017
Senate House Library
Senate House Library ( SHL ) is judged by Metro to be one of the ‘10 beautiful libraries to visit across the UK’, and features in a Londonist news item about those that are situated in London. The article singles out the library’s leather-sofa-furnished Reading Room for praise describing it as the ‘most impressive space of all, perfect for curling up with a book (or for a sneaky nap).’ SHL is also applauded in a Secret London feature entitled ‘9 of London’s most beautiful reading spots’.  

Wave of rhino killings points to shifting poaching patterns in South Africa

Tuesday 23 May 2017
Institute of Commonwealth Studies
Professor Keith Somerville , senior research fellow at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies ( ICWS ), discusses South Africa’s continuing rhino poaching problem in The Conversation . He believes that a wave of rhino killings points to shifting poaching patterns, which the police and wildlife authorities are struggling to contain. ‘The ability of criminal syndicates to evolve their operations to take account of improvements in security in some areas suggests a shifting and complex war between anti-poaching units and the poachers, weighted in favour of the killers and smugglers.’

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