Institute of Commonwealth Studies co-hosts a series of events for the UK country visit of the UN Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent

Wednesday 26 September 2012

The Institute of Commonwealth Studies and the Human Rights Consortium will be co-hosting a series of events for the occasion of the UK country visit of the United Nations Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent.

Dr Corinne Lennox, Lecturer in human rights at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies, together with Esther Ojulari, a recent graduate of the Institute’s renowned MA in Understanding and Securing Human Rights and an incoming School of Advanced Study Scholarship PhD student to the Institute, have been working with the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights to help organise the week-long visit to the UK.

The Institute of Commonwealth Studies, one of the 10 prestigious institutes that make up the University of London’s School of Advanced Study, will host the event series in Senate House on 2-3 October 2012. The Working Group will participate in a meeting and round table discussion with civil society organisations; in a public round table discussion on the right to education of children and young people of African descent in the UK; and in two public seminars on ‘Legacies of Fanon’ and ‘Reparations and legacies of British Slave ownership’.

The Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent, which was established by the Commission on Human Rights resolution 2002/68 of 25 April 2002, is a 5-member expert working group that emerged out of the 2001 World Conference Against Racism. They have conducted a handful of country visits, including to the US. The main purpose of country visits is to examine good practices and to make recommendations for reform.  The Working Group will produce a report of the country visit, which will include recommendations to the UK government.

Dr Corinne Lennox, whose research and policy work focuses mainly on the rights of minorities, including Afro-descendants, and on human rights and development, said: “The visit of the Working Group of Experts on People of African descent represents an important opportunity for the UK government to revist and revise many of its policies on racism and non-discrimination, which have so far failed to eliminate inequalities experienced by people of African descent in the UK.”

For further information about the event series and to attend, please contact Olga Jimenez on +44 (0)20 7862 8871 or at olga.Jimenez@sas.ac.uk

Notes for editors:

  1. For further information contact: Dee Burn, Head of Communications and External Relations, School of Advanced Study, University of London on +44 (0)20 7862 8670 or at dee.burn@sas.ac.uk
  2. Dr Corinne Lennox is Lecturer in Human Rights at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies. Her research and policy work focuses mainly on the rights of minorities, including Afro-descendants, and on human rights and development.  Among her recent work she was lead author of the UNDP Resource Guide and Toolkit on Marginalised Minorities in Development Programming.  She worked previously for Minority Rights Group International from 2001-2006 as an advocacy officer, where she cooperated with Afro-descendant activists in Latin America, including in the context of the World Conference Against Racism in Durban. www.commonwealth.sas.ac.uk/about-us/staff/dr-corinne-lennox/
  3. The Institute of Commonwealth Studies (ICwS) is the only postgraduate academic institution in the UK devoted to the study of the Commonwealth. Founded in 1949, its purpose is to promote interdisciplinary and inter-regional research on the Commonwealth and its member nations in the fields of history, politics and other social sciences. Its areas of specialism include international development, governance, human rights, north-south relations and conflict and security. It is also home to the longest-running interdisciplinary and practice-oriented human rights MA programme in the UK. The Institute of Commonwealth Studies is a member institute of the School of Advanced Study, University of London.
    www.commonwealth.sas.ac.uk
  4. The Human Rights Consortium (HRC), founded in 2009, brings together the multidisciplinary expertise in human rights found in several institutes of the School of Advanced Study, as well as collaborating with individuals and organisations with an interest in the subject. The main aim of the Consortium is to facilitate, promote and disseminate academic and policy work on human rights by holding conferences and seminars, hosting visiting fellows, coordinating the publication of high quality work in the field, and establishing a network of human rights researchers, policy-makers and practitioners across the UK and internationally, with a view to collaborating on a range of activities.
    www.sas.ac.uk/hrc
  5. The School of Advanced Study at the University of London is the UK’s national centre for the support of researchers and the promotion of research in the humanities and social sciences. The School brings together the specialised scholarship and resources of 10 prestigious research institutes to offer academic opportunities, facilities and stimulation across a wide range of subject areas for the benefit of the national and international scholarly community. The member institutes of the School are the Institutes of Advanced Legal Studies, Classical Studies, Commonwealth Studies, English Studies, Germanic & Romance Studies, Historical Research, Musical Research, Philosophy, Study of the Americas, and The Warburg Institute. The School also hosts a cross-disciplinary centre, the Human Rights Consortium. 
    www.sas.ac.uk