Dame Lynne Brindley to be awarded honorary doctorate at the School’s 2012 graduation ceremony

Tuesday 31 July 2012

The School of Advanced Study, University of London is pleased to announce that Dame Lynne Brindley, DBE will be awarded the degree of Doctor of Literature honoris causa at its graduation ceremony on Saturday 15 December 2012.

This honour recognises a lifetime of achievement in the support of world-class research by Dame Lynne Brindley. As Chief Executive of the British Library, she led a major strategic development and modernisation programme to ensure that the Library remains relevant, innovative and accessible in the 21st century. Lynne Brindley came to the British Library from the University of Leeds where she was Pro-Vice-Chancellor and University Librarian. Previously she was a senior consultant with KPMG and has held leadership positions in information technology and knowledge management at Aston University and at the London School of Economics.

Dame Lynne is a council member of the Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and is on the board of the Creative Industries Knowledge Transfer Network. She chaired the national Online Learning Taskforce set up by HEFCE and was a member of the UK’s Strategic Advisory Board for Intellectual Property (SABIP). She is a member of the Council of City University and on the Court of the Goldsmiths’’ Company. She is active in high level international, European and national bodies concerned with media and information society initiatives, digital infrastructure and libraries, and cultural and public sector leadership. Lynne Brindley was appointed a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire in the New Year Honours List 2008.

Professor Roger Kain CBE FBA, Dean and Chief Executive of the School of Advanced Study, said “I am delighted that the School is honoring Dame Lynne Brindley’s distinguished career. Under her leadership, the British Library has become a key player in building the UK’s digital research environment. Her achievements in the support of world-class research and innovation are second to none, and are that which makes conferring the honorary degree at the SAS graduation ceremony particularly appropriate, given the School’s national mission to promote and support research in the humanities and social sciences.”

Dame Lynne Brindley said: “I have a long association with the University of London and have a particular interest in and support for humanities and scholarship, and in digital research, so it will be an honour to receive this award from the School of Advanced Study in December.”

Notes for editors:
1. For further information please contact Dee Burn at the School of Advanced Study, University of London at dee.burn@sas.ac.uk or 020 7862 8670 or 07808 102 735 (mobile).

2. The School of Advanced Study at the University of London is the UK’s national centre for the promotion and facilitation of research in the humanities and social sciences. The School brings together 10 prestigious research institutes to offer academic opportunities, facilities and stimulation across a wide range of subject areas for the benefit of the national and international scholarly community. The member institutes of the School are the Institutes of Advanced Legal Studies, Classical Studies, Commonwealth Studies, English Studies, Germanic & Romance Studies, Historical Research, Musical Research, Philosophy, Study of the Americas, and the Warburg Institute. The School also hosts a cross-disciplinary centre, the Human Rights Consortium, dedicated to the facilitation, promotion and dissemination of academic and policy work on human rights.
www.sas.ac.uk

3. Dame Lynne Brindley has been the Chief Executive of the British Library since July 2000. She has led a major strategic development and modernisation programme to ensure that the British Library remains relevant, innovative and accessible in the 21st century. Dame Brindley came to the British Library from the University of Leeds where she was Pro-Vice-Chancellor. Previously she was a senior consultant with KPMG and has held leadership positions in information technology and knowledge management at Aston University and at the London School of Economics. She is a council member of the Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and is on the board of the Creative Industries Knowledge Transfer Network. Dame Brindley chaired the national Online Learning Taskforce set up by HEFCE and was a member of the UK’s Strategic Advisory Board for Intellectual Property (SABIP). She is a member of the Council of City University and on the Court of the Goldmsiths’ Company. She is active in high level international, European and national bodies concerned with media and information society initiatives, digital infrastructure and libraries, and cultural and public sector leadership. She was appointed a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire in the New Year Honours List 2008.
www.bl.uk/aboutus/governance/blboard/memberslist/lbrindley/

4. The British Library is the national library of the United Kingdom and one of the world's greatest research libraries. It provides world class information services to the academic, business, research and scientific communities and offers unparalleled access to the world's largest and most comprehensive research collection. The Library's collection has developed over 250 years and exceeds 150 million separate items representing every age of written civilisation and includes books, journals, manuscripts, maps, stamps, music, patents, photographs, newspapers and sound recordings in all written and spoken languages. Up to 10 million people visit the British Library website - www.bl.uk  - every year where they can view up to 4 million digitised collection items and over 40 million pages.